wheaten terrierThe Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is different from other terriers as they have a soft wavy coat in a wheaten color like wheat.

They love to jump and dig so fences should be high enough to prevent the dog from going over and into the ground deep enough to prevent digging out.

They are good with older children but they are not recommended for homes with younger children. Young children will poke and pull at the dog and overwhelm the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier.


Origin

Although their exact origin is unknown, they were in Ireland during the 1700’s running free. The Irish Kennel Club first recognized the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier in 1937.

Then they were shown at the Westminster Dog Show in February 1947. In 1962 the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Club of America began. They began competing in the terrier group of the American Kennel Club in 1973.


Group

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is a member of the American Kennel Club’s terrier group.


Size

Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers are 17 to 19 inches tall to the shoulder and weigh 30 to 40 pounds.


Color

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier, as the name suggests, only has one standard color. That standard color is wheaten. They have no standard markings.


Temperament

Happy, friendly, loyal, energetic, playful and affectionate are some of the traits of a Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier. They love their families and they want to be in the middle of family activities.

They can have some aggression with other dogs of the same sex, otherwise they are friendly with other dogs. Some may not be good with cats and other small animals due to their strong instinct to chase prey.



Energy

Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers have a high energy level and are often lively and bouncy. They will need lots of exercise to release their physical energy. If you have a fenced yard, make sure the fence is tall enough that the dog can’t jump over it.

These terriers with plenty of energy can excel at agility, flyball, tracking and herding. Any of these activities will release your dog’s physical and mental energy.


Health

Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers have a average life span of 12 to 14 years of age. Generally a healthy breed but they are prone to Addison’s disease, sensitivity to food, cataracts and renal dysplasia.


Shedding

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier has a soft wavy coat that will not shed a lot, although they will shed lightly. Daily brushing and combing is necessary to keep the coat tangle free along with regular trimmings.


Other Grooming

Other grooming includes the basics of cleaning their teeth, trimming their nails when necessary and cleaning their ears weekly.


Training

Being headstrong dogs, they can be difficult to train. They will need to be on a leash at all times and they need a confident owner that will follow through with consistent rules and training.

They can be stubborn and it may be hard to keep your Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier’s attention for training. Therefore, you should keep the training sessions short and include a variety of activities.


soft coated wheaten terrier running in leavesSeparation Anxiety

Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers, if left alone for too long, will display bad behaviors such as excessive barking and destructive digging.

Early socialization is necessary with this breed to help them relax around new people and other dogs. A puppy obedience class is a great way to begin socialization and training.

As your puppy grows, you can enroll them in an advanced obedience class. Then you may want to try agility classes or flyball, herding or tracking activities.


Rescue

If you are interested in the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier dog breed, please consider adoption. There are many purebred dogs and puppies that are available for adoption. Search for a Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier rescue group in your area by starting here at PetFinder.


What do you think about the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier dog breed? Do you have a Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier? Share a story about your dog or leave a comment below. The information on this website is not intended to replace the advice of your own veterinarian, dog trainer, or dog behavioral specialist.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest